National Records of Scotland

Preserving the past, Recording the present, Informing the future

Corrections on 9 August 2012

Corrections on 9 August 2012

We regret that the following errors were found in the Registrar General's Annual Review published on 2 August 2012. We corrected these errors on 9 August 2012.

Important Points - Deaths

  • respiratory system diseases corrected from 6,749 to 6,791

Chapter 3 : Deaths

Some other major causes of deaths

  • respiratory system diseases corrected from 6,749 to 6,791
  • accidents corrected from 1,585 to 1,657

These errors were due to a failure to update promptly the part of National Records of Scotland (NRS)'s Vital Events computer system that assigns cause of death codes to the appropriate subtotals for the statistical table that was used to produce these figures for Chapter 3. As a result, some respiratory system disease deaths and some accidental deaths, whose causes had codes that NRS used for the first time in 2011, were wrongly counted in that table under another heading. The NRS computer system was updated before the other tables were finalised, so none of the other statistics published in August 2012 were affected by this problem.

Appendix 2 - Notes, definitions and quality of statistics

Population projections

'The latest national projections were published in October 2009 and were based on 2008 population estimates' has been corrected to 'The latest national projections were published in October 2011 and were based on 2010 population estimates'

Chapter 1 - Population

Scotland's position within Europe

The following caveat has also been added to the footnote on page 22:

The Eurostat projections of population in selected European countries are not directly comparable to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) projections of population in the countries of the UK. The Eurostat projections are based on estimates of the population at 1 January while the ONS projections are based on estimates of the population at 30 June. The methodologies in determining the underlying fertility, mortality and migration assumptions also differ.