National Records of Scotland

Preserving the past, Recording the present, Informing the future

2014

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Jack and Emily are Scotland’s top baby names

Thursday, 18 Dec 2014
Demography News Release - Image

National Records of Scotland reveal most popular names in 2014

Jack and Emily were the most popular first forenames for babies whose births were registered in 2014, National Records of Scotland (NRS) announced today. Jack was the top boys’ name for a seventh consecutive year, and Emily rose from third to replace Sophie as the most popular girls’ name.  

James was the second most popular boys' name for the second year running, Lewis remained third and Oliver fourth. Logan (up one place to fifth), Daniel (down one place to sixth), Noah (up six places to seventh). Charlie (up one place to eighth), Lucas (down one place to ninth) and Alexander (down three places to tenth) make up the rest of the boys' Top Ten. Noah was the only new entrant to the boys' Top Ten; Harry (down five places to fifteenth) was the only name to drop out of it.

The fastest climbers within the boys’ Top Twenty were Noah, Max (up 6 places to 13th) and Adam (up 6 places to 14th). There were two new entrants to the boys’ Top Twenty: Aaron (up 8 places to 17th) and Cameron (up 4 places to 19th); Alfie and Riley dropped out.

Sophie was the second most popular girls’ name, after being top for the previous nine years. Olivia dropped from second to third, and Isla remained in fourth place. Jessica (up two places to fifth), Ava (which remained sixth), Amelia (up one place to seventh), Lucy (down three places to eighth), Lily (up two places to ninth), Ella (down one place to joint tenth) and Sophia (up three places to joint tenth) made up the rest of the girls’ Top Ten. Lily and Sophia were the only new entrants to the girls’ Top Ten; Millie (down five places to fifteenth) was the only name to drop out of it  (Note: there is an ‘extra’ new entrant to the Top Ten because two names were joint tenth).

The fastest climbers within the girls’ Top Twenty were Grace (up 5 places to 13th) and Freya (up 4 places to 14th). There were two new entrants to the girls’ Top Twenty: Eilidh (up 4 places to 19th) and Anna (up 5 places to 20th); Erin and Eva dropped out. 

National Records of Scotland registered the births of almost 26,900 boys and over 25,600 girls in the first 11 months of 2014. The top fifty boys’ first names accounted for 41 per cent of all those registered and the top fifty girls’ first names accounted for 39 per cent of the registrations. Jack was the first name of only 2.0 per cent of the boys, and Emily was the first name of just 2.1 per cent of the girls.

Parents chose over 7,400 different first forenames for their children and almost 4,800 of these were unique (in the first 11 months of 2014).

Big climbers within the 2014 baby name top fifty charts include:

  • Aaron (up 8 places to 17th)
  • Callum (up 12 places to 21st)
  • Rory (up 15 places to 27th)
  • Oscar (up 9 places to joint 31st)
  • Samuel (up 8 places to joint 38th)
  • Layla (up 9 places to 25th)
  • Molly (up 10 places to 35th)
  • Sofia (up 8 places to 40th) 

At the same time, National records of Scotland (NRS) has added to its website a new section on the ‘Most Common Surnames in the Birth, Marriage and Death Registers’. This gives, for each of a number of years, the surnames which appeared (in total) at least ten times in that year’s registers. The data show little change in the ‘top’ surnames: for example, ‘Smith’, ‘Brown’ and ‘Wilson’ were first, second and third (respectively) in 1975, and in 1995, and in 2013. 

The full publication Babys' First Names 2014 and Most Common Surnames in the Birth, Marriage and Death Registers are available on this website.

Media Contact
For media enquiries from journalists only please contact the Scottish Government, Communications Office on 0131 244 2682.

 

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Census 2011: Release 3M

Thursday, 18 Dec 2014
Demography News Release - image

Detailed characteristics on Transport in Scotland

The statistics published today by the Registrar General for Scotland on the Scotland’s Census website present further details on transport (Release 3M), from national to local level.

Key points - Release 3M

Travel to work

  • In 2011, a total of 2.4 million people aged 16 to 74 in Scotland were in employment (excluding full-time students). Of these people, 11 per cent (260,000) worked mainly at or from home. Just under a third (32 per cent) of people aged 16 to 74 in the National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) category of ‘Small employers and own account workers’ worked at or mainly from home.
  • Of the 2.1 million people who did not work at or mainly from home, 36 per cent travelled less than 5km to their workplace, 43 per cent between 5km and 30km and 8 per cent 30km or more. A further 12 per cent had no fixed place of work, worked on an offshore installation or worked outside the UK. 
  • The proportion of people who travelled up to 5km to their workplace was higher for females (43 per cent) than for males (30 per cent). Conversely, the proportion of people who travelled 30km or more to their workplace was higher for males (10 per cent) than for females (6 per cent). The proportion of people in the NS-SeC category of ‘Higher managerial, administrative and professional occupations’ who travelled 30km or more to their workplace was 15 per cent for males and 12 per cent for females.  
  • The proportion of males aged 16 to 74 in employment who had no fixed place of work, worked on an offshore installation or worked outside the UK was 18 per cent; the corresponding proportion for females was 6 per cent. 

Travel to study

  • Information is available from the 2011 Census on the method of travel and distance travelled to place of study for the 872,000 people aged 4 and over who were studying [Footnote 1], excluding those who studied at or mainly from home. 
  • The great majority (88 per cent) of children aged 4 to 11 travelled less than 5km to school, including 72 per cent who travelled less than 2km. Just under three quarters (74 per cent) of children aged 12 to 15 travelled less than 5km to school, including 42 per cent who travelled less than 2km. Just over half (51 per cent) of people aged 18 and over who were studying travelled less than 5km to their place of study. 
  • Of the 430,000 people who travelled less than 2 km to their place of study, 73 per cent went by foot, 6 per cent by bus and 17 per cent as a passenger in a car or van. 
  • Of the 428,000 people who travelled 2km or more to their place of study, 31 per cent did so as a car driver or passenger, 43 per cent travelled by bus and 7 per cent travelled by train.  Just over half (52 per cent) of people who travelled 5km up to 10km to their place of study went by bus, while just over a fifth (21 per cent) of those who travelled 30km or more went by train. 

Travel to work or study

  • In 2011, 43 per cent of the 1.6 million households in Scotland with at least one person working or studying [Footnote 2] reported they had one car or van available, while a further 37 per cent had two or more cars or vans available. A fifth (20 per cent) had no cars or vans available. 
  • Of the 411,000 households who had one person working or studying and at least one car or van available, 63 per cent of those people drove to their place of work or study, 24 per cent went by some other method of transport and 13 per cent worked or studied mainly at or from home. In 82 per cent of the 873,000 households with two or more people working or studying and at least one car or van available, at least one person drove to their place of work or study. 

Households with a person with a long-term health problem or disability and their age by number of unpaid carers in household and economic activity

  • In 2011, 28 per cent (664,000) of the 2.4 million households in Scotland contained one person with a long-term health problem or disability that limited their day-to-day activities. In 42 per cent (280,000) of these households, the person with a long-term health problem or disability was aged 65 or over. 
  • Of the 664,000 households with one person with a long-term health problem or disability, 17 per cent had one unpaid carer living in the household and 5 per cent had two or more unpaid carers. For households where the person with the long-term health problem or disability was aged under 16, 31 per cent had one unpaid carer living in the household (including 16 per cent where the carer was economically inactive) and 25 per cent had two or more unpaid carers. 
  • Seven per cent (158,000) of households contained two or more persons with a long-term health problem or disability. Just over half (52 per cent) of these households had one or more unpaid carer living in the household, including 26 per cent with one unpaid carer who was economically inactive and 18 per cent with two or more unpaid carers.

Communal establishment type by resident type and whether or not resident one year ago

  • Of the 92,000 residents of communal establishments in Scotland at the time of the 2011 Census, 47 per cent (43,000) lived at the same establishment one year before. 
  • The proportion of communal establishment residents who lived in the same establishment one year before was highest for adult care homes (77 per cent), boarding schools (61 per cent) and hospitals (60 per cent). It was lowest for university halls of residence (10 per cent) and hostels for the homeless (21 per cent). 

The tables of census results covered in Release 3M are listed below. They are a mixture of ‘Detailed Characteristics’ (DC) and ‘Local Characteristics’ (LC) tables. DC versions of tables include the most complex cross-tabulations and are therefore not available at smaller geographic areas (generally available down to postcode sectors). LC versions of tables include less complex cross-tabulations and are therefore available down to the lowest geographic levels (generally census output areas). In some instances, no LC version of a table is produced as a statistical disclosure control measure. Similarly, the DC version of some tables is produced for council areas only.

Tables included in Release 3M

DC3306SC

Households with a person with a long-term health problem or disability and their age by number of unpaid carers in household and economic activity

LC3306SC Households with a person with a long-term health problem or disability and their age by number of unpaid carers in household and economic activity
DC4801SCca Communal establishment type by resident type and whether or not resident one year ago
DC6126SC Youngest dependent child by approximated social grade of Household Reference Person (HRP)
LC6126SC Youngest dependent child by approximated social grade of Household Reference Person (HRP)
LC7101SC Method of travel to work by age
DC7102SC Distance travelled to work by sex by age
LC7102SC Distance travelled to work by age
DC7103SC Distance travelled to place of study by age
LC7103SC Distance travelled to place of study by age
LC7104SC Method of travel to study by age
DC7403SC Method of travel to work or study by number of people working or studying in household by car or van availability
LC7403SC Method of travel to work or study by number of people working or studying in household by car or van availability
LC7604SC National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) by method of travel to work or study
DC7608SC National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) by distance travelled to work or place of study by sex
LC7608SC National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) by distance travelled to work or place of study
DC7701SC Distance travelled to work or place of study by method of travel by sex
LC7701SC Distance travelled to work or place of study by method of travel by sex
DC7702SC Distance travelled to place of study by method of travel by sex
LC7702SC Distance travelled to place of study by method of travel by sex

All the data contained in this release can be accessed on the Scotland’s Census website.


Footnotes
1) Excludes some 4 and 5 year olds (a total of 11,867 in Scotland) who were reported as being in full-time education but for whom no information on their place of study or method of travel to study was provided.
2) Persons in employment and full-time students.

 

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Historic Poll Tax Records from the 1690s Go Online

Tuesday, 16 Dec 2014
Detail of E70/16/1 Account of poll tax, 1693

National Records of Scotland poll tax records from the 1690’s are now available online. The tax records dating from the last decade of the seventeenth century, a time of foreign wars, economic troubles, famine and poor weather, are being made available on the ScotlandsPlaces website.

Poll taxes were imposed in 1694, 1695 and twice in 1698 in order to pay for the Scottish army and navy. Almost 1500 pages of tax records provide a snapshot of thousands of Scots from every walk of life, from cottars to dukes. They complement other historical tax records already available at ScotlandsPlaces in revealing life for ordinary people in late seventeenth century Scotland. From aristocrats to workmen, the Scottish poll tax rolls from the reign of William and Mary reveal an extraordinary range of people who were liable to pay the tax imposed to meet the cost of foreign wars and the defence of the kingdom. Searchable by parish, the tax rolls provide a valuable new resource for social and family history.

Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Europe and External Affairs, said:

“Making these tax rolls available online gives a worldwide audience the opportunity to gain an interest into the Scotland of more than 300 years ago.”

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“The poll tax rolls from the 1690s are a unique resource that the National Records of Scotland is delighted to be making available to researchers from all over the world, through ScotlandsPlaces, our partnership with the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland and the National Library of Scotland.”

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Jacobite Documents from National Records of Scotland Go On Show

Thursday, 11 Dec 2014
Detail of GD1/616/11 List of army officers who deserted to the Jacobite forces

Unique archives from the National Records of Scotland collections are on display as part of a major exhibition at the National Library of Scotland. Game of Crowns marks the centenary of the Jacobite Rising of 1715 and tells the full story of the dynastic, religious and political power play of early 18th century Scotland.

The free exhibition brings together key documents from a number of collections including 13 rarely-seen manuscripts from NRS. The specially prepared archives from NRS include military commands from both sides, letters penned in the midst of the action and a 1715 list of officers who deserted to the rebels. The primary sources on display are complemented by books, maps, portraits and newly-recorded songs.

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“I’m delighted that the National Records of Scotland is supporting the National Library of Scotland with loans from our rich holdings of documents concerning the Jacobite movement. This kind of partnership working is a critical part of making the most of the heritage treasures that we have in Scotland.”

Game of Crowns is open daily from 10 December 2014 to 10 May 2015 at the National Library of Scotland, George IV Bridge, Edinburgh, EH1 1EW. Details can be found on the National Library of Scotland website.

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How much do you know about Scotland’s population? Take our quiz now.

Wednesday, 10 Dec 2014
How much do you know about Scotland's population-image

The National Records of Scotland has published a wide range of statistics about Scotland's population throughout 2014. Scotland's population is now at its highest ever level. But what else did we learn? Take this quiz of 10 questions now to learn more.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/population_quiz

Note: the above link will take you to another website.

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The Duke and the Tattooist – the 1925 Valuation Rolls

Tuesday, 9 Dec 2014
Photo of Duke of Westminster and Coco Chanel

A tattoo artist living in a rented flat in Glasgow, and Britain’s richest man, are two of the 2.1 million entries in the Valuation Rolls for 1925 that have been released online by the National Records of Scotland.

A tattoo specialist calling himself ‘Prince Valler’ is the most unusual person revealed in this snapshot of Scotland in 1925. He is unique in being listed as a ‘tattooer’, a professional tattooist, working from a rented flat at 63 Stewart Street in the east end of Glasgow. His flat was modest, with a rateable value of £11. 15s. He later ran his business from a shop in Glasgow.

By contrast the Duke of Westminster owned an extensive estate in the north-west of Sutherland. During the 1920s the duke and his lover, the famous designer Coco Chanel, spent happy fishing holidays at Stack Lodge and Lochmore House on the estate.

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1925 provides family and local history researchers worldwide with another powerful digital tool. The rolls will allow people to discover more about where and how Scots were living in the mid-1920s, fourteen years after the Census of 1911. This latest release is part of the commitment by the National Records of Scotland to provide access to the key records that researchers want.”

More than 2.1 million indexed names and addresses from the valuation rolls will go online, as records of every owner, tenant and occupier of property in Scotland in 1925 are released on ScotlandsPeople website, the seventh release in a resource now spanning fifty years between 1875 and 1925.

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Births, deaths and other vital events - third quarter 2014

Wednesday, 10 Dec 2014
Demography News Release Image

Provisional figures for births, deaths and other vital events registered during the third quarter of 2014 are published today by the National Records of Scotland.

The statistics show that 12,938 deaths were registered in the third quarter of the year - 714 (5.8 per cent) more than in the same period of 2013. This was the highest number of third quarter deaths in a decade although levels remain substantially lower than those seen in the 1980s and 1990s.

The provisional figures also show that:

  • 14,930 births were registered in Scotland between 1 July and 30 September 2014 – 422 (2.9 per cent) more than in the same period of 2013. The total number of births for the third quarter fell to a low of  around 13,200 in 2001. It then rose  to around 15,500 in 2008 before falling more gradually to the current level of around 14,900 in 2014. 
  • There were 11,037 marriages, 725 more than the figure for the third quarter of 2013 (a rise of 7.0 per cent). 
  • There were 140 civil partnerships (65 male and 75 female), 54 fewer than during the third quarter of 2013.

Compared with the same period in 2013, the number of deaths from coronary heart disease fell by 2.0 per cent to 1,585, deaths from stroke rose by 0.3 per cent to 988, and there were 3,892 deaths from cancer (an increase of 1.1 per cent).

The attached infographic (PDF 266 KB) gives a visual representation of the information held within the publication.

The full publication, Births, deaths and other vital events - quarterly figures, is available on this website.
 

Media Contact
For media enquiries from journalists only please contact the Scottish Government, Communications Office on 0131 244 2682.

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National Records of Scotland Awarded UK Accredited Archive Service Status

Tuesday, 2 Dec 2014
Accredited Archive Service Logo

National Records of Scotland has today been awarded accredited archive service status by the UK Archive Service Accreditation Committee. 

Archive Service Accreditation is the new quality standard for archives services across the UK which has been developed in partnership with the archives sector and its stakeholders.  Accredited Archive Services ensure the long-term collection, preservation and accessibility of our archive heritage. The standard recognises good performance in all areas of archive service delivery.  Achieving accredited status demonstrates that National Records of Scotland has met clearly defined national standards relating to management and resourcing; the care of its unique collections and what the service offers to its entire range of users.

NRS Chief Executive, Tim Ellis welcomed the award:  ‘I am very pleased that NRS has achieved accredited archive status. It is very important to us in our leadership role within the Scottish Archive Sector and I know that the accreditation process will prove in time to be a key means of driving improvement across all archives. NRS found it to be a demanding but rewarding experience and a stimulus to the further improvements we shall make to achieve our overall vision for the organisation. I extend congratulations to all the other services who have won this award ’.

The other Scottish archive service to be recognised in this round of awards is the Lothian Health Services Archive.  Falkirk Archives was the first Scottish archive to be awarded accredited status.

  • The eight newly accredited archive services are:
  • Barts Health NHS Trust Archives
  • Glamorgan Archives
  • Gloucestershire Archives
  • Institute of Education Archive, University of London
  • Jersey Archive
  • Lothian Health Services Archive
  • National Records of Scotland
  • Norfolk Record Office
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NRS Welcomes its First Skills for the Future Trainee

Tuesday, 2 Dec 2014
Photograph of Callum Duff, first Skills for the Future trainee

NRS is taking part in the Scottish Council on Archives’ HLF-funded traineeship scheme Opening Up Scotland's Archives by hosting one of six archive trainees. Callum Duff will be working in the Electronic Records Unit based in West Register House, assisting the team there in the development of the Digital Preservation Programme. The one-year traineeship will see Callum explore the many aspects of NRS’s work on digital preservation as well as exploring the use of social media to communicate the work of the organisation to a wider audience.

As part of the traineeship Callum will gain a greater understanding of the theory and practice of the management of records and archives. This will include learning about the issues surrounding the preservation of born digital records and the approaches taken by NRS and other institutions. The culmination of the 12 month scheme will see a range of digital preservation training materials prepared by Callum, designed for use by NRS staff.

Deputy Keeper Laura Mitchell says: ”I am delighted to welcome Callum to NRS as part of this project, which aims to improve skills and service delivery within the Scottish archives sector. Archives have a significant skills gap around digital preservation, and it is therefore particularly fitting that Callum will not only develop his own skills in this area during his time with us, but will also be instrumental in engaging with record creators and producing training materials which will help others develop their skills too”.

Over the course of the year Callum will be producing a regular blog detailing his progress on the traineeship, impressions on working for the organisation, experiences at workshops and training courses, links to articles of interest and building relationships with other host organisations involved in the traineeship scheme.

As a trainee Callum will be able to take advantage of a range of training opportunities, including a week long “basecamp” at the UK National Archives in Kew and studying for the module in Digitisation and Digital Preservation run by the Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS) at the University of Dundee.

Callum says: “I’m looking forward to learning new skills, consolidating previous experience and gaining a greater understanding of digital preservation and its impact on the information environment. This is a unique opportunity which I intend to grasp with both hands. The traineeship not only provides practical experience but also allows me to immerse myself in a progressive community with the opportunity to attend meetings, placements and workshops”.

Callum has worked for over 20 years in all aspects of Information Management with organisations such as Teesside Archives, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Historic Scotland and Heriot Watt University. He has also managed a number of events designed to encourage the public to discover more about the heritage of his hometown of Saltburn-by-the-Sea through the use of social media. One event involved liaising with the Northern Regional Film and Television Archive and ITV Archives to secure material filmed in Saltburn for screening at an event to commemorate 150 years since the town was founded in 1861.

Callum has set up a Twitter account and can be found at @CallumDuff68. Please feel free to follow Callum and recommend any organisations or individuals which could be of interest to Callum in his time with NRS. Callum can also be contacted at [email protected].

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Census 2011: Release 3L

Thursday, 27 Nov 2014
Demography News Release - Image

Detailed characteristics on Housing and Accommodation in Scotland

The statistics published today by the Registrar General for Scotland on the Scotland’s Census website present further details on housing and accommodation (Release 3L), from national to local level.

Key points - Release 3L

Car or van availability

  • At the time of the 2011 Census, 69 per cent of the 2.4 million households in Scotland had at least one car or van available, including 27 per cent which had two or more cars or vans available. Just under a third (31 per cent) of households had no cars or vans available, compared with 34 per cent in 2001 and 43 per cent in 1991. 
  • The proportion of households with no cars or vans available was highest for those comprising one person aged 65 or over living alone (64 per cent) and for those comprising of all full-time students (63 per cent). The proportion of households with two or more cars or vans available was highest for married couple families with children, at 63 per cent. 
  • The proportion of households with at least one car or van available was higher for those who owned their property (85 per cent) than for those in social rented accommodation (37 per cent) or in private rented accommodation (57 per cent). It was also higher for households living in houses or bungalows (81 per cent) than for those in flats (49 per cent). 
  • The proportion of households with no car or van available was generally higher for those where the Household Reference Person (HRP) [Footnote 1] was from a minority ethnic group; it was highest for households where the HRP was from the ‘African’ (60 per cent) or ‘Caribbean or Black’ (49 per cent) ethnic groups. 
  • Of the 473,000 people in households who had a long-term health problem or disability that limited their day-to-day activities a lot, 46 per cent lived in households with no cars or vans available. The corresponding proportion was 34 per cent for the 523,000 people whose day-day activities were limited a little and 19 per cent for the 4.2 million people who had no limiting long-term health problem. 
  • In 2011, a total of 4.3 million people aged 16 and over lived in households in Scotland. Of those who were employees, 85 per cent lived in households with at least one car or van available. The corresponding proportion for people who were self-employed was 93 per cent; it was lower for people who were retired (66 per cent), unemployed (57 per cent) or long-term sick or disabled (48 per cent). 
  • Slightly fewer males (21 per cent) than females (26 per cent) aged 16 and over lived in households with no cars or vans available. 
  • A total of 348,000 people living in households in Scotland in 2011 were born outside the UK. The proportion of these people in households with no cars or vans available decreased with length of residence in the UK: it was 54 per cent for those resident for less than two years and 21 per cent for those resident for ten years or more. 
  • Of the 2.7 million people aged 16 and over in households in Scotland who were working or studying in the week before the 2011 Census, 85 per cent lived in households with at least one car or van available. This proportion was 97 per cent for those who drove to their workplace or place of study, 83 per cent for those who travelled as a passenger in a car or van, 79 per cent for those who travelled by train or underground, 73 per cent for those who travelled by bicycle, 64 per cent for those who went on foot and 61 per cent for those who travelled by bus. 

Tenure by economic activity by age - Household Reference Persons

  • In 2011, there were 1.8 million Household Reference Persons (HRPs) in Scotland aged 16 to 64. Of those who owned their property with a mortgage or loan, the great majority (97 per cent) were economically active. The corresponding proportions for HRPs who owned their own property outright, lived in social rented accommodation or lived in private rented accommodation were 81 per cent, 63 per cent and 81 per cent respectively.

The tables of census results covered in Release 3L are listed below. They are a mixture of ‘Detailed Characteristics’(DC) and ‘Local Characteristics’ (LC) tables. DC versions of tables include the most complex cross-tabulations and are therefore not available at smaller geographic areas (generally available down to postcode sectors). LC versions of tables include less complex cross-tabulations and are therefore available down to the lowest geographic levels (generally census output areas). In some instances, no LC version of a table is produced as a statistical disclosure control measure. Similarly, the DC version of some tables is produced for council areas only.

Tables included in Release 3L

DC1401SC

Household composition by car or van availability

LC1401SC Household composition by car or van availability
DC2406SC Length of residence in the UK by car or van availability
LC2406SC Length of residence in the UK by car or van availability
DC3405SC Car or van availability by long-term health problem or disability by sex by age
LC3405SC Car or van availability by long-term health problem or disability by sex by age
DC4202SC Tenure by car or van availability by ethnic group of Household Reference Person
LC4202SC Tenure by car or van availability by ethnic group of Household Reference Person
DC4203SC Tenure by car or van availability by ethnic group
LC4203SC Tenure by car or van availability by ethnic group
DC4415SC Accommodation type by car or van availability by number of people aged 17 and over in household
LC4415SC Accommodation type by car or van availability by number of people aged 17 and over in household
DC4416SC Tenure by car or van availability by number of people aged 17 and over in household
LC4416SC Tenure by car or van availability by number of people aged 17 and over in household
DC4601SC Tenure by economic activity by age – Household Reference Persons
DC4605SC Tenure by National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) by age – Household Reference Persons
DC4609SC Tenure by car or van availability by economic activity
LC4609SC Tenure by car or van availability by economic activity
DC6403SC Approximated social grade by tenure by car or van availability
LC6403SC Approximated social grade by tenure by car or van availability
DC6404SC Economic activity by car or van availability by sex
LC6404SC Economic activity by car or van availability
DC6405SC Economic activity by car or van availability by method of travel to work or study
LC6405SC Economic activity by car or van availability by method of travel to work or study

All the data contained in this release can be accessed on the Scotland’s Census website.

Footnote

  1. The Household Reference Person provides an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person. Please go to the Scotland’s Census website for further details.
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